Monday, 17 March 2014

No.11034, Monday 17 Mar 2014, Neyartha



ACROSS
1 Dr. Strangelove, a bumbling diamond-pursuing detective? (5,7) PETER SELLERS (GK/2)
          I initially wanted to draw Sidney Wang, but then, as many people are not aware of him. A classic dialogue from Sidney Wang perfectly fits crosswords many times: "Answer simple. Question very hard!"

8 Bind with tea in the midst of a revolutionary number (7) ENCHAIN (CHA in NINE<)
9 Mishandled lab log was comprehensive (6) GLOBAL (LAB LOG)*
11 Hint about hoarding a 13 Dn. brought back to Hawaii is related to healthy nutrition (9) EUTROPHIC (CUE< hoarding PORT< (13dn, dessert wine) HI=Hawaii)
12 Letters from Mossad humour the ascetic (5) SADHU (T)
14 Coastal shrubs Marie cut in-between jobs (9) TAMARISKS (MARIe between TASKS)
16 Capital sailor overwhelms the pilot officer in an equestrian sport (4) OSLO (OS=ordinary seaman overwhelms PO in POLO)
18 Sound from a sty? (4) OINK (E)
          Easy, for pigs, difficult for prigs
19 Crazy paratroopers chase away a couple of Romeos with the model in the TV serial (4,5) SOAP OPERA (PARATROOPERS -RR -T)*
21 Problem for the immediate descendants (5) ISSUE (2)
22 Sight a pet playing with the pasta (9) SPAGHETTI (SIGHT A PET)*
23 Margins lost in lottery game after backing the German with a comic’s asset (6) TIMING (bINGo backing MIT=with in German)
25 European with the uninitiated Russian (7) IBERIAN (sIBERIAN)
26 German children’s garden may prepare them for primary school (12) KINDER GARTEN CD (in German, children=KINDER, garden=GARTEN)
          It is important to have kinder teachers in kindergarten ...

DOWN
2 Passions seem extinct, unfortunately (11) EXCITEMENTS (SEEM EXTINCT)*
3 Charms turning up a covering for horse heads is owned jointly by you and me (8) ENAMOURS (MANE< OURS)
4 Deductive reasoning error reported on paper (9) SYNTHESIS (~SIN THESIS)
          And when you do it in broad daylight, it become photosynthesis
5 Reason to make use of sorcery to look for the master (5) LOGIC (MAGIC+LO-MA)
6 Leaders of the Egyptian group of investment service managers show self-interest (6) EGOISM (acrostic)
7 Fool stepping up power for the health resort (3) SPA (SAP with P stepped up=moved up)
8 UK drivers ignored disconcerting acceleration carried out using a computer network (10) ELECTRONIC (ACCERLATION -AA=drivers, not necessarily from the UK)
          People with an inveterate urge to drive continuously can join Automobiles Anonymous for de-addiction. If you drink and drive, you can get a joint membership of both AAs
10 Robot’s confiscation of iodine points to takeover of human activity by machines (10) AUTOMATION (AUTOMATON confiscates I)
13 Leave complaint in speech about the post-meal drink (7,4) DESSERT WINE (~DESERT WHINE)
15 Naval group following the points on a note (9) SEAFARING (S E A FA RING)
17 Spoon-shaped coracle up in flames after taking in hydrogen (8) COCHLEAR (CORACLE+H)*
20 Invention’s aim (6) DESIGN (2)
          This clue is a double definition by design, designed by a desi with gn in his name!
22 Smooth transition (5) SEGUE (E)
24 Annoy some of their kids (3) IRK (T)

77 comments:

  1. Could not get a few on the northwestern corner. GLOBAL, SADHU were easy. So was KINDERGARTEN.

    SOAP OPERA, SPAGHETTI were well anagrammed. Not sure of anno for OSLO, SUAVE. Yet to see blog.

    MAGIC, IBERIAN, COCHLEAR were good.

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  2. 5 Reason to make use of sorcery to look for the master (5) MAGIC (LOGIC-LO+MA)
    LOGIC [-ma](+LO) GIC

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    Replies
    1. I did it right in the grid and messed it up while posting. Thanks. Otherwise I'd have had PETER SEMLERS at 1a!

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    2. Kishore's magical gimmick for logical logic ! ;-)

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    3. You can call it magical logic or logical magic !

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  3. If 1A, Peter Sellers is right (it has to be) 5D 'magic' does not fit. It has to be logic.I don't get the logic of it. I also filled in magic. Pl. enlighten.

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    1. It is logic. That is what I filled up and highlighted as defn=reason. But messed up when typing in the answer into the blogger and hence the anno too. Now rectified.

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    2. It is LOGIC. It was a typo by Kishore. If you notice, he highlighted REASON as the definition.

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    3. sorcery MAGIC
      look LO for the master MA
      Defn: Reason (+LO)[-ma]GIC

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  4. 1A - Kishore's comment reminded me of the title of a Malayalam movie of late 1980s -Prashnam Gurutaram, Karyam Nissaram. I am aware that it may be spelt differently.

    I will leave it to Ajeesh to do the honours of translation for the benefit of others.

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    Replies
    1. Ajeesh is presently somewhere in the southern sector travelling between Calicut and Chennai. Might have deplaned/detrained/ debussed today morn.

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    2. Correct spelling. But they are different movies. 1) Severe problem 2) SimBle matter

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    3. Just now reached chennai home.had to travel in soldiers chamber in train :-(

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    4. Nice to know that you know the correct spelling of simBle!

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    5. Oh, yes, Ajeesh. They are different movies. Nanri.

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  5. Look: LO for the (substitute) MA (Master)

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    Replies
    1. That was for Padmanabhan.

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    2. I mixed up MAGIC and LOGIC and Peter Sellers evaded me.

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    3. Even with Logic, Peter Sellers evaded me by 'magic', having forgotten about the movie.

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    4. He definitely can elude or delude you. He can make you think that the pink panther is a blue carbuncle and he is Sherrinford Holmes ...

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    5. Peter Sellers- I have very fond remembrance for one of his classics- "The Party" detailing his (mis)adventures at a party!

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    6. I'll never get tired of watching The Party especially the opening sequence

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  6. Setter's name to be put in the title to the blog.

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  7. " It is important to have kinder teachers in kindergarten ..."

    This was wrt "a kind old police man who bit small boys in half" from Kennedy's One winter night in August:

    http://quizilla.teennick.com/poems/7400816/one-winter-night-in-august

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  8. UK in 8D confused me. probably that is what Kishore meant by his comment.

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  9. Happy Holi.
    A HoliDay Special, may be one from the Admiral's set, will be welcome.

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    Replies
    1. I hope it does not have too many colours in it. If so, I will find it difficult, being colour blind ...

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    2. Maybe a holiday up north, not so elsewhere

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  10. People with an inveterate urge to drive continuously can join Automobiles Anonymous for de-addiction. If you drink and drive, you can get a joint membership of both AAs

    In Hyderabad, the police provide you with a temporary membership for a night or two in the cooler, with counselling sessions thrown in.

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    Replies
    1. Raghu 8:56 :-)

      As I went through the said comment from Kishore, for a moment I blinked, since I read the word as invertebrate. ;-)

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    2. An invertebrate has a good chance of becoming a PM in many countries !

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    3. With my flair for writing advertising taglines, I liked the following in a handbill brought out by a refreshment joint.

      If you must drink and drive, try our fresh juice.

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    4. I read one- "Think & drive"!

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  11. Hi Folks! Happy Holi!Good Crossword.Could get all but few. Missed out on Peter Sellers despite all the crossings available.

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  12. In LOGIC, the arguments may be either 'deductive' or 'inductive'. In deduction, we begin with some statements/'premises' assumed to be true, and then determine what else would have to be true if the premises are true. For instance, Kishore may begin with some axioms and then determine what he can prove to be true given those axioms. In induction, he begins with some data, and then determines what general conclusions can logically be derived from these data. However, induction does not prove that the theory is correct as there may be alternative theories that the data support.

    Deduction or induction, by itself, is inadequate for a scientific approach, which requires a gradual synthesis of both. Deduction gives absolute proof, but it never makes contact with the real world. It offers no place for observation or experimentation, and no way to test the validity of the premises. While induction is driven by observation, it never approaches actual proof of a theory.

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    1. We also come across terms like propositional logic, predicate logic,intuitionistic logic, modal logic, philosophical logic and mathematical logic.

      Kishore may lead us on with Converse, Inverse and Reverse Logic (not Jack Green's album). To put some of them in context:
      Statement: If p then q
      Converse: If q then p
      Inverse: If not p then not q
      Contrapositive: If not q then not p

      If a statement is true, the contrapositive is also logically true.
      So also, when the converse is true, the inverse is also logically true.

      In reverse logic, we take a logically verified statement of the form "because of X, therefore Y" and interpret it backward, as if it said "because of Y, therefore X"

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    2. I have had enough of syllogisms when studying for the Logic paper in my CA intermediate exams...

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    3. All crows are black therefore anything black is a crow!!

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    4. I had read this fallacy in a Logic textbook:

      Light comes from the Sun.
      Feathers are light
      Therefore, feathers come from the Sun.

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    5. Actually, fallacies are more interesting than logic! For eg: See my 948 above!

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    6. Instead of textual logic, I prefer the Boolean algebra kind of logic. Since it is abstract and one's thought is not cluttered by the flavour of language, like black or light as given above.

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    7. Induction, of course, in the form of mathematical induction is a wonderful tool.If true for 1 and 2, n and n+1, stretching to a boundless infinity ...

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  13. 20 Dn This clue is a double definition by design, designed by a desi with gn in his name!

    Neyartha ('provisional intent' in Sanskrit) is the pen-name of TS Ganesh. As Shuchi writes in her blog, 'there are 'techie' quirks like using 'gate' to stand for logic gates, fractions (70% of the storerooms, 5/9th of something else!) and the inclination towards the sciences (chemistry and maths figure prominently).... Like with Gridman, the framework is assuredly Indian. Trains will travel between Delhi-Chennai, university will be BITS (his alma mater) in place of OU and dance will be BHARATNATYAM rather than BALL.' He had the habit, in yesteryears, of commenting on (and sometimes even criticising) his own Cryptics as an outsider.

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    Replies
    1. When a Sutra is of explicit sense and clarity, we call it nitartha‟vibhaktartha.
      A Sutra, whose sense is yet to be deduced, is referred to as neyartha.

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  14. ...in a lighter vein, ever heard of SMART LOGIC ? If not, pl read this :

    Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson go on a camping trip. After a good dinner and a bottle of wine, they retire for the night, and go to sleep. Some hours later, Holmes wakes up and nudges his faithful friend. "Watson, look up at the sky and tell me what you see."
    "I see millions and millions of stars, Holmes" replies Watson.
    "And what do you deduce from that?"
    Watson ponders for a minute.
    "Well, astronomically, it tells me that there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, I observe that Saturn is in Leo. Horologically, I deduce that the time is approximately a quarter past three. Meteorologically, I suspect that we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. Theologically, I can see that God is all powerful, and that we are a small and insignificant part of the universe. What does it tell you, Holmes?" Holmes is silent for a moment. "Watson, you idiot!" he says. "Someone has stolen our tent!"

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  15. 10 Robot’s confiscation of iodine points to takeover of human activity by machines (10) AUTOMATION (AUTOMATON confiscates I)

    I think the definition needs to be changed. Automaton =Robot. Human activity by machines = Automation. Robot was highlighted in the clue.

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  16. Happy Holi - and no paper tomorrow, so saving part of today's cw to complete tomorrow!

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    Replies
    1. Rita,
      No need to do that, you can access the CW through thr online edition of the paper

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    2. Happy Holi to you too and everyone else.

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    3. To make it clearer:
      While some centres may not have printed edition tomorrow because of holiday there today, readers can access the crossword online tomorrow in the free Web edition or paid-for e-paper.
      Those centres will have a fresh crossword on Wednesday - so if they want to do the Tuesday crossword they must do it by taking a print of the crossword that is online.

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    4. Lots of logic in this also. Day of logic- fortunately today is not 1st April.

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  17. MB,
    Thanks for your hilarious but practical logic. Though I have read it earlier, it still brings a smile and reminds us of "Elementary my dear Watson!".

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  18. http://www.crosswordunclued.com/2012/10/peter-is-safe.html

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  19. First of the "Solve & enjoy" is our Peter today. Luckily, Neyartha did not play it 'safe'!

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  20. Good one from Neyartha. Earlier we used to see a letter or two replacing to form the clue towards the answer. Now, Neyartha has pushed the envelope with an entire word !!

    An OINK and a Grunt to him !!



    All this talk about deductive and Inductive and smart logic got my brains fried in the Induction heater !! Enemy's enemy is my friend (Congress is famous for this, using Kejriwal against NAMO-- Narayana !!) ) Where does this logic fall?

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    Replies
    1. Countering Chai with Chanakya ...

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  21. Ah yes. A very Happy and Colourful Holi to ye-all !! May our lives be filled with many crosswords as colourful and varied as from the Pitchkaaris of the compilers !!!

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  22. What does 'top bants' mean?

    Is it the same as 'banter'? The word whose meaning we all know.

    Anyway, I can't help indulging in that often. I don't know whether it will land me in trouble one day.

    Recently while on a train, I saw, during the whole of day journey, a man had a bag clinging to his chest.

    Just before the destination came, I asked him: "Enna sir, yedhaavadhu pokkisham vechchu irukeengala?" For a moment he was taken aback; then recovering himself he gave some reply while his two women companions laughed.

    I don't if the above query comes under 'banter'.

    But one that I said this morning might!

    As I was going down the steps from my second-floor apartment, I saw a co-resident coming up. I asked him: "What, have you joined the Aam Adhmi Party?"

    Instantly he roared and we spent a few agreeable moments in a snatch of conversation.
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    He was carrying a broom that he had bought in the street.

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  23. Maybe, I should curb myself of this 'top bants' tendency.

    Read:

    http://www.xojane.co.uk/issues/top-banter-lads

    Part of it:

    It always seems to happen in unexpected places – the lifts at work, the till at the supermarket, at fun parties. Banter ... makes it impossible for you to escape. ‘Sorry what were you saying?’, ‘oh don’t worry just a bit of banter’.

    ...banter makes me instinctively feel like I should have something to say, some kind of comeback. But I just don’t. The comments are so casual in their offensiveness that it’s hard to address them. (emphasis mine)

    That man on the train must have been offended by my remark, however light-hearted it was from my viewpoint.

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    Replies
    1. Well said. Particularly the sentence in italics.
      Good-natured raillery may, at times, be found offensive by the person at the receiving end.
      We curb ourselves from OR cure ourselves of' a practice or a habit.

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  24. Will tomorrow's CW carry the number 11034A?

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  25. Could someone explain the reference to the German in 23D please? I guessed the answer from "comic's asset"? How did MIT and TIM happen? Thanks.

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  26. As mentioned in the post above, 'Mit' in German translates to the English 'with'. After backing (reversal) it becomes TIM.

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